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Comments for Win4Lin

20 Jan 2002 15:35 Shatai

Re: Different from WINE?

> How is Win4Lin different from WINE,
> except that it's not free?


WINE is an implementation of the Windows API and also allows the execution of Windows applications through this pseudo-emulation layer. Win4Lin infact emulates the entire operating system to allow for programs to execute in a stable, running copy of Windows(emulated, but this paradigm is far more intelligent and workable than emulating the programs on a per application basis.) WINE is far less contained and secure than Win4Lin, also. Does that help answer your question?

01 Jul 2001 14:10 northavonnerd

Re: 2.4.x kernel and deb support?

> Win4lin is an excelent peice of software
> and runs
> windows stuff better than windows
> :-)
>
> However, when is support going to be
> released for
> the 2.4.x kernels!? 2.4.x has been out
> for almost
> 3 months now as 'stable' and yet there
> is still no
> sign of even a beta of the kernel
> modules. It
> wouldn't bother me so much if it was
> being
> developed as open source, but its not,
> and I
> assume people are being paid to work
> on it!!
>
> Also, the lack of deb support in the
> latest
> versions is a shame although it is
> possible to
> modify the install scripts and remove
> all
> references to rpm.
>
> I am sure these are things that will
> change, but a
> little more haste would be greatly
> appreciated!
>
> sam


well of course win4lin version 3.0 with 2.4.x series and M$ network support did eventually come out (early June IIRC) and then the next topic inevitably moved up the users' wishlist! ...

I find W4L an excellent product much less resource hungry than some alternatives (I have a slack4/win4lin/win95 installtion on a 24 Mb DX4-100 laptop - try that with VmWare!). And it's much more stable with horrid M$ Office products that I sometimes have to use, than wine.

I'm sorry to learn that Debian users consider they're poorly served by the unholy practice of distributing in rpm only - but us benighted slack users have had to come to terms with it long ago.

So far everything I've seriously wanted to install that came in rpm format I've managed to, including several versions of win4lin - and one learns a lot in the process. But that's life^H^H^H^Hslack

23 Mar 2001 23:11 muelas1

2.4.x kernel and deb support?
Win4lin is an excelent peice of software and runs

windows stuff better than windows :-)

However, when is support going to be released for

the 2.4.x kernels!? 2.4.x has been out for almost

3 months now as 'stable' and yet there is still no

sign of even a beta of the kernel modules. It

wouldn't bother me so much if it was being

developed as open source, but its not, and I

assume people are being paid to work on it!!

Also, the lack of deb support in the latest

versions is a shame although it is possible to

modify the install scripts and remove all

references to rpm.

I am sure these are things that will change, but a

little more haste would be greatly appreciated!

sam

02 Aug 2000 17:50 ironwolve

Works great.
Haha, did think it was a joke also.

Same folks who did Merge for SCO.
Just compile in kernel, and go.

Optimized for Office applications, network support via winsock.dll (replacement).

Not for gamers, but for Business customers.
FAST!

06 Apr 2000 00:49 davepeet

Re: Different from WINE?
Click on the link "Win4Lin 1.0" in the "announcements" box above. This thread
has more discussions about Win4Lin.
Down a ways is a posting that has an excerpt from a page on the TreLOS web site:

http://www.trelos.com/trelos/Trelos/Products/Win4Lin_Whitepaper.htm
The excerpt discusses the difference between Win4Lin, VMWare and WINE.
Refer to the entire document on the TreLOS web site for an overview of how
Win4Lin works. All the Win4Lin documentation is on the site as well
as a searchable FAQs database. So please peruse the site because it
has a LOT of info about Win4Lin.

03 Apr 2000 10:34 tomasb

Different from WINE?
How is Win4Lin different from WINE, except that it's not free?

02 Apr 2000 19:40 sweidner

Win4Lin 1.0
My organization worked as an independent parter with TreLOS to launch their new web site and the commercial availability of Win4Lin. As someone independent of TreLOS, I can tell you three things - first, this is not a joke. I have been relegated to a Windows 9x workstation and Linux servers in my home and business primarily because of the need for application support - not because I don't want to use StarOffice or some other Linux-based equivalent, but because the world around me isn't always willing to adapt. My copy of Win4Lin that came from working on this project is finally allowing me to set up a Linux workstation with which I can be productive in my business environment.

Second, this isn't a flash in the pan or a quickly-assembled widget to take advantage of a ripe time in the marketplace. Win4Lin has been under development for several years and is actually widely used in private licensing, from the information I've gathered while working on the project. They've worked hard, addressed many issues, and had it tested in very wide-ranging environments likely to be duplicated in homes and offices around the user community.

Finally, the inability to run Windows NT or Windows 2000 as the emulator platform has a minimal effect. Win4Lin 1.0 isn't intended to allow you to use the Linux filesystem to run your Windows NT server applications. If you run Windows NT server apps, you've made a conscious decision to go with the NT server platform. However, it *will* run Microsoft ODBC clients - including the MSSQL client utilities, MS Access, and other ODBC-dependent database access applications - addresing the earlier poster's question, and proving that the Win 9x platform decision makes sense when balancing application support with efficiency of operation.

01 Apr 2000 18:02 jormola

1st April?
Is this just another April Fool, a very carefully planned one with a web page and on-line orders and all though, or is this A Real Thing?

If it is, it looks like small killer app to me... I guess $50 isn't that much for it if it's real and works well. They even say it comes not only in RPM format but also in Debian package format. That's something I've never seen before when it comes to distributing of binary-only apps. Very friendly. As a Debian user, that gives a nice impression on the company. Interesting.

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