Comments for GNU VCDImager/VCDRip

29 Aug 2004 05:36 vitualis

Re: Questionable type of software


>

> % I can't imagine any legal uses for

> this

> % piece of software, especially the

> % "Rip" portion of it, how

> can

> % this project have GNU logo attached

> to

> % it?

>

Quite simple as someone else has already eluded to.

I may well want to author my own VCD with self made content like menus and home video. At some point later, I may wish to reauthor that VCD -- for example, add more video, change the menus, etc.

If at this stage I had already deleted the original source media files and original XML files, then the RIP tool in absolutely invaluable. It allows you to decompile the VCD back into all the media source files as well as the XML descripter... everything you need to reauthor / edit the VCD.

The "rip" tool has absolutely no bearing on DVDs. It is basically a tool that decompiles an image of a VCD. Considering that commercial VCDs are a rather rare beast AND that there is absolutely no reason to use vcdxrip on a commercial VCD to copy it (any DAO copying program will do), the rip tool is in use and spirit for reauthoring/editing self made content.

Best regards,

Michael Tam

(author of VCDImager Tools GUI)

22 Jul 2004 02:38 GreenAdder

Re: Questionable type of software


> I can't imagine any legal uses for this

> piece of software, especially the

> "Rip" portion of it, how can

> this project have GNU logo attached to

> it?

As an independent low-budget filmmaker, the ability to capture, convert, edit, and author with GNU software has been a Godsend to me. While the technology surely can be used to subvert copyrighted materials, it can also be used to create new ones.

19 Mar 2001 09:32 cgallaty

Re: Questionable type of software

> I can't imagine any legal uses for this
> piece of software, especially the
> "Rip" portion of it, how can
> this project have GNU logo attached to
> it?


So are you seriously asking this, or are you bored and only interested in being flame bait? This whole IP issue is starting to get out of hand. What kills me is that it's only come up again because now things are digital. I've owned a VCR for years. It's a little device that has a record button and therefore can only exist as a tool to copy broadcast television and violate the IP rights of NBC, ABC, CBS, et al. I've even seen VCRs at Besy Buy with _2_ slots, so that you can copy one (obviously copyrighted) tape to another. Where does it end?

There are two separate issues here that I wish people would take a look at. There are tons of DVD/VCD ripping programs out there. Programs that will even step DVD files down to DivX or VCD for you. There are also programs to burn this to CD's. Now, first of all, given the reasoning above, if we're all just data "pirates", why bother to write a program ourselves? Cost? What makes pirating the software to pirate DVDs any more/less ethical. People looking for a free ride don't usually stop to build a car. Whether people like it or not, digital media is becoming the norm today. Everytime I go to BlockBuster, the VHS isles have lost ground to the DVD isles. Most video cameras I find in the store are comming with "firewire" ports on them to allow digital transfer of video to a PC. Obviously the growing trend in cameras getting smaller can only mean that people can sneak into a movie theater and make a "screener" of the latest flick, right?

Enough. I have the right to make home movies with friends and family, I have a right to store the video I'm made, in digital, on a VCD, and play that at any time on my DVD player. Hell, I even have the same rights that any motion picture company has to slap a copyright on a VCD I made, and SELL it. The comment on ripping is moronic. Much like the VHS format I'm leaving behind, if I rip a VCD and edit it, I'm most likely going to lose some quality, like any DIGITAL format, including DVD. I could turn around and store every last bit of footage I shoot in a higher rez on a CD in a normal file format, but do I always want to store _2_ copies of everything. (Maybe I do, but should I have to?)

Can I use this software to pirate video? Yes. Why not? But again, I've been able to do that for quite a while with a VCR, but noone argues about whether they should be sold. I can also photo copy an entire book, why not go after photo copy manufacturers? I can off someone with a crowbar, why are they still on the market?

Unless you have any valid arguments to post, you're wasting everyone's time here. This is an open source project that has many valid uses, protected by law, and even encouraged in the capitalistic society that the world is becomming.

-cgallaty-

19 Mar 2001 00:40 timecop

Re: Questionable type of software

>
> BTW: Are you the same timecop as the
> one from the
> gimp-devel list?
>


Doesn't it show? :)

18 Mar 2001 06:53 khk

Re: Questionable type of software

> I can't imagine any legal uses for this
> piece of software, especially the
> "Rip" portion of it, how can
> this project have GNU logo attached to
> it?

So what about putting home videos on VCDs and at a
later time trying to
access the MPEG data again to do something else
wth it. I don't keep everyting
I put on a VCD on my hard disk, so I have a need
to get at the MPEG stream
again. A perfectly valid and legal reason for the
RIP function.

BTW: Are you the same timecop as the one from the
gimp-devel list?

18 Mar 2001 05:01 timecop

Questionable type of software
I can't imagine any legal uses for this piece of software, especially the "Rip" portion of it, how can this project have GNU logo attached to it?

Screenshot

Project Spotlight

ReciJournal

An open, cross-platform journaling program.

Screenshot

Project Spotlight

Veusz

A scientific plotting package.