Projects / sash

sash

Sash is a stand-alone shell for system recovery in Linux. Its purpose is to make system recovery possible in many cases where there are missing shared libraries or executables. It does this by firstly being linked statically, and secondly by including versions of many of the standard utilities within itself. Some of these built-in commands are chattr, chmod, chown, cp, dd, ed, find, grep, gzip, ln, ls, mkdir, mknod, more, mount, mv, rm, and tar.

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Recent releases

  •  04 Jul 2004 20:42

    Release Notes: This release has dd fixes, -e and -s options for the -mount command, and a new -f option for the command line so that script files using sash can be executed. The -mount and -umount commands have been modified to work for both Linux and BSD systems,

    •  18 Mar 2002 22:03

      Release Notes: New HAVE_LINUX_ATTR and HAVE_LINUX_MOUNT defines, ext3 support, and fixes to the -gzip and -gunzip commands.

      •  24 Jun 2000 07:01

        Release Notes: This version has the "-ar" built-in command for extracting files from archive files.

        •  04 Aug 1999 22:15

          No changes have been submitted for this release.

          Recent comments

          11 May 2002 07:02 baiti

          sash patches
          during the last two years I have developed a set of patches for sash. I have contacted the original author of sash, David Bell multiple times and asked him to consider inclusion of those new features in future versions of sash. So far I have _never_ received any response.

          I plan to make these patches available as a separate project on freshmeat now -- stay tuned!

          11 Dec 2000 09:36 gtk

          Great program
          Has saved me from major hassle on numerous occations.

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