Projects / Request Tracker

Request Tracker

RT is an industrial-grade trouble ticketing system. It lets a group of people intelligently and efficiently manage requests submitted by a community of users. RT is used by systems administrators, customer support staffs, NOCs, developers, and even marketing departments to track issues, outages, bugs, requests, and all kinds of other things at thousands of sites around the world.

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Recent releases

  •  22 Jul 2013 19:21

    Release Notes: This release contains important security fixes.

    •  05 Aug 2011 07:13

      Release Notes: This version adds configurable ticket lifecycles, a mobile interface, integrated stock answers, and dozens of other new features.

      •  11 Sep 2006 16:44

        Release Notes: This release includes numerous small cleanups and improvements. It fixes the dreaded "infinite relogin" bug.

        •  18 Jun 2006 15:23

          Release Notes: The full changelog contains over 500 "interesting" changes and over 1000 commits. The RT UI has been redone in XHTML and CSS. Users have the ability to customize their RT home page and set their default search preferences. Basic reporting and charting, reminders on tickets, the ability to make custom fields link to and include content from other systems, and bulk updating of custom fields have been added.

          •  14 May 2004 04:03

            Release Notes: Assorted changes were made.

            Recent comments

            23 Feb 2003 14:07 afitz

            Re: Impressions on RT
            I am on a redhat 8 box and I agree the dependancies suck for this app. I still have not gotten them all sadisfied. And at this point am giving up...


            > First of all, it's not for the faint of
            > heart. First daunting task is fulfilling
            > its "myriad dependencies"; i
            > kid you not, these number in the tens of
            > perl modules needed to run the thing.
            > While the included script uses the CPAN
            > module to automate most tasks, some of
            > them might fail and it takes a bit of
            > intervention to finish installing
            > required modules; in my case, it was
            > unable to instal HTML::Mason (and it's
            > quite an important dependency) so I had
            > to install it by hand.
            >
            > Next, you're left to wrestle with
            > mod_perl, which is a pretty hairy beast
            > by itself. On a Red Hat 7.2 box,
            > mod_perl is installed as a DSO loadable
            > module, and, as RT's documentation
            > states, this configuration is not
            > advisable; indeed, apache simply crashed
            > when rt's configuration was present in
            > httpd.conf. RT's recommendation is to
            > compile mod_perl statically, again, a
            > task not fit for beginners as it entails
            > downloading and compiling apache and
            > mod_perl from source.
            >
            > I ended up ditching mod_perl and going
            > the mod_fastcgi route, which worked fine
            > and voila, there was my functional RT
            > installation.
            >
            > Once RT is working, you'll be faced with
            > a system that's so versatile, it can be
            > intimidating. It's well thought-out, and
            > has plenty of options, but could be a
            > bit overkill for many needs.
            >
            > However, anyone brave enough to face the
            > daunting installation process, and
            > patient enough to learn all the
            > intricacies this system has, will be
            > rewarded with a jaw-droppingly
            > impressive tool for request management.
            > Once I finished the installation and
            > played with the system a little, I
            > demoed to the staff here and they were
            > all awed at how RT keeps track of
            > *everything* and lets us use all that
            > accumulated knowledge to solve problems
            > easier and faster, and most important,
            > with a degree of accountability we'd
            > only dreamed of.
            >
            > Highly recommended, assuming you have a
            > competent geek available for
            > installation.


            05 Sep 2002 10:21 jeffcovey

            Re: Impressions on RT

            You might consider your installation difficulties a problem with your
            distribution; with Debian, all you have to do to install RT is type
            "apt-get install request-tracker". :)


            In any event, it's worth the trouble. We've been using RT to handle
            support requests here at freshmeat for a couple of years, and it's
            been a dream compared to what we were doing before.

            03 Sep 2002 16:34 roadmaster

            Impressions on RT
            First of all, it's not for the faint of heart. First daunting task is fulfilling its "myriad dependencies"; i kid you not, these number in the tens of perl modules needed to run the thing. While the included script uses the CPAN module to automate most tasks, some of them might fail and it takes a bit of intervention to finish installing required modules; in my case, it was unable to instal HTML::Mason (and it's quite an important dependency) so I had to install it by hand.

            Next, you're left to wrestle with mod_perl, which is a pretty hairy beast by itself. On a Red Hat 7.2 box, mod_perl is installed as a DSO loadable module, and, as RT's documentation states, this configuration is not advisable; indeed, apache simply crashed when rt's configuration was present in httpd.conf. RT's recommendation is to compile mod_perl statically, again, a task not fit for beginners as it entails downloading and compiling apache and mod_perl from source.

            I ended up ditching mod_perl and going the mod_fastcgi route, which worked fine and voila, there was my functional RT installation.

            Once RT is working, you'll be faced with a system that's so versatile, it can be intimidating. It's well thought-out, and has plenty of options, but could be a bit overkill for many needs.

            However, anyone brave enough to face the daunting installation process, and patient enough to learn all the intricacies this system has, will be rewarded with a jaw-droppingly impressive tool for request management. Once I finished the installation and played with the system a little, I demoed to the staff here and they were all awed at how RT keeps track of *everything* and lets us use all that accumulated knowledge to solve problems easier and faster, and most important, with a degree of accountability we'd only dreamed of.

            Highly recommended, assuming you have a competent geek available for installation.

            19 Apr 2002 16:08 wolf451man

            Excellent Application
            We have been using RT for some time. Started off in the version 1, then when version 2 came out, with a nice layout in the web gui, we started using it even more. Have used it for software project specific bug reports, project development, service calls. Amazingly easy to setup and configure. Adaptable. Extendable.

            22 Oct 2001 16:45 unstylish

            Re: It's good

            > Very good - but better documentation
            > would be helpful, eg on the mail side of
            > things (the web documentation is
            > fine!).


            The documentation is getting better. The links from the main site make it easier to set up. Very good for ISP's needing an automated abuse@isp.com, help@isp.com, and billing@isp.com system, but still keeping the three (or more) departments separate.

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