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Comments for lustre

22 Jun 2007 11:03 adilger

Lustre is fully GPL
Please note that the comments here about Lustre not being freely available are quite out-of-date. The most recent version of Lustre has been freely available for immediate download for the past 2 years, since the 1.4.0 release.

28 Feb 2005 00:17 lustre

1.2.4 now freely available


> Lustre 1.2.4 is only going to be of use

> if they "forward port" it to a current

> kernel, otherwise what would be the use

> of it? It sounds as though it'll be made

> "public" around the time Linux 2.6.11 or

> 2.6.12 will be out. Many users may be

> using an out-of-the-box distribution,

> such as Fedora, and therefore be at

> around Linux 2.6.9. Any public release

> of Lustre will have to work on kernels

> in this range, if there is to be any

> demand for it.

Although we have not yet released new binary packages, we have included our latest supported kernel patches (for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3's 2.4.21-based kernel, and SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 9's 2.6.5-based kernel) in today's public release of Lustre 1.2.4. We'll make new binary RPMs available shortly, but decided not to release the old ones from July, which are based on vendor kernels with now-known security vulnerabilities. In the meantime, please feel free to compile your own.

We don't currently support kernel.org 2.6 kernels, both because our customers don't run them, and they don't seem very stable (the two are probably quite related). There are people who maintain and occasionally release new Lustre patches for kernel.org kernels, however; you'll find talk of it in the lustre-discuss archives.

> I'm not going to hold my breath - it

> costs $1,500 per site (if I understand

> their pricing scheme correctly) which

> would put it out of the range of anyone

> who just wanted to share the code. (Tech

> support calls are also fairly steep, at

> $300 per hour.)

Just for the record, we typically do not charge by the hour for support. We sell flat-rate annual support agreements, the cost of which is based on the size and complexity of the deployment.

One of our goals in building Lustre is to produce an excellent cluster file system for the Linux community, and so we will continue to make regular releases to the general public. But we also want to continue to improve Lustre and support our customers, which means we need to stay in business. It doesn't do anyone any good if we close up shop, and send our dozens of full-time Lustre developers to find new jobs.

Impatient organizations who need the latest features and fixes, or timely and guaranteed support, can pay for access to the newest releases. Others can wait, and be assured that they will eventually get the code that today's customers are paying for. There's no sinister agenda, no attempt to "take Lustre proprietary", just a balancing act. Like it or not, it's the model that seems to be working for us.

Thank you for your interest in Lustre -- I hope you enjoy Lustre 1.2.4!

17 Jan 2005 03:10 jmcoursi

Not really usable
I was thrilled at first to see this filesystem, but

- They are not releasing the 1.4 as the announcement says, but the 1.04

- having a look at the changelog since the 1.0.4 version is sobering : the 1.0.4 still has single point of failure modes and failure is not transparent to the apps.

I dont' see the point of playing with such an outdated release ? The bugs we'll find will be fixed or long outdated, they won't get any useful input, and our data won't be safe...

30 Dec 2004 09:23 imipak

Re: >1.0 still not freely available


> (snip)

> The next public release, from the 1.2.x

> series, will be made some time in

> February 2005. It will likely be a quite

> modern version -- perhaps Lustre 1.2.4,

> which was released in July 2004.

>

> Maybe it's possible to get the source

> code from someone that has GPL licensed

> source code?!?

I'm not going to hold my breath - it costs $1,500 per site (if I understand their pricing scheme correctly) which would put it out of the range of anyone who just wanted to share the code. (Tech support calls are also fairly steep, at $300 per hour.)

From the perspective of the company selling Lustre, this is probably not a bad way to work things. Have the code "free", but just a little too pricey to escape into the wild. I'm not going to criticise them for figuring out a way to make the GPL earn them money.

Lustre 1.2.4 is only going to be of use if they "forward port" it to a current kernel, otherwise what would be the use of it? It sounds as though it'll be made "public" around the time Linux 2.6.11 or 2.6.12 will be out. Many users may be using an out-of-the-box distribution, such as Fedora, and therefore be at around Linux 2.6.9. Any public release of Lustre will have to work on kernels in this range, if there is to be any demand for it.

27 Dec 2004 17:37 damjan

Re: >1.0 still not freely available

> From the looks of it, never.

Well their FAQ (http://www.clusterfs.com/faq.html) says this:


When will the next publicly-available release be?


The next public release, from the 1.2.x series, will be made some time in February 2005. It will likely be a quite modern version -- perhaps Lustre 1.2.4, which was released in July 2004.


Maybe it's possible to get the source code from someone that has GPL licensed source code?!?

27 Dec 2004 11:11 imipak

Re: >1.0 still not freely available

> Anybody have any inside on when
> clusterfs are going to release the
> newest distributions freely?

From the looks of it, never. From their perspective, that's not too bad a deal - they make the best networked filesystem for high-performance stuff, so they've cornered that market. On the other hand, I don't see how they could possibly keep pace with the development of the Linux kernel and any related network drivers and code. There are simply too many projects and too many components in each, for any closed-source team.


They've ported Lustre to OS-X and the PowerPC. They've doubled the number of nodes it'll scale to. They've put in a huge amout of effort. And who, exactly, is ever going to know about it, if it's never promoted or included in any distribution? Who, exactly, is going to buy such high-end software from a company nobody has ever heard of? Well, other than the occasional research lab. That's going to pay their bills? I'm amazed they've not starved to death, waiting for the next sale.

15 May 2004 06:59 jbruvoll

>1.0 still not freely available
Anybody have any inside on when clusterfs are going to release the newest distributions freely?

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