Projects / CVS

CVS

CVS is a version control system, which allows you to keep old versions of files (usually source code), keep a log of who, when, and why changes occurred, etc., like RCS or SCCS. Unlike the simpler systems, CVS does not just operate on one file at a time or one directory at a time, but operates on hierarchical collections of directories consisting of version controlled files. CVS helps to manage releases and to control the concurrent editing of source files among multiple authors. CVS allows triggers to enable/log/control various operations and works well over a wide area network.

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Recent releases

  •  11 May 2008 19:49

    Release Notes: An "-n" option to revert the "-N" option was introduced. The command "cvs blame" as an alias to "cvs annotate" was added. A new "IgnoreUnknownConfigKeys" config option was added. Data loss on crashes of heavily loaded systems is now avoided. Locking during import was corrected. A server hang with enabled compression was fixed. Applying diffs when checking out very old revisions was sped up significantly. Several other improvements and bugfixes were made.

    •  20 May 2005 16:05

      Release Notes: This release fixes several minor security issues, including CAN-2005-0753, several minor potential vulnerabilities in the contributed Perl scripts, and compilation on IRIX 5.3.

      •  22 Mar 2005 17:17

        Release Notes: This release fixes a few serious bugs in both the CVS client and server. An intermittent assertion failure on checkout was fixed. A final fix for the infamous "Red File" bug on Windows was included. An upgrade is recommended for all clients and servers.

        •  19 Aug 2004 20:32

          Release Notes: This version fixes several serious security holes in the CVS server executable as well as fixing one other minor bug in both the CVS client and server. It is recommended for all CVS clients and servers.

          •  09 Jan 2004 11:02

            Release Notes: This release fixes two security issues with root access and file system traversal. Furthermore, it includes some fixes for case sensitivity, symbolic link handling, portability, and the build process.

            Recent comments

            13 Jan 2004 08:01 liqweed

            Re: free cvs server

            >
            > There is a free cvs server! No need for
            > your project to be open source, access
            > with any freely available cvs client for
            > any OS( tortoise is probably the easiest
            > on win )
            >
            > www.cvsdude.org
            >


            CVSdude is a great service, but the bummer is - it's confied to 2Mb of web space (for free). Larger accounts cost money (which of course may very well be worth it). So this option is only available for relatively small projects.

            Other than that - great service.

            11 Nov 2003 08:05 scottbradley

            free cvs server

            There is a free cvs server! No need for your project to be open source, access with any freely available cvs client for any OS( tortoise is probably the easiest on win )

            www.cvsdude.org (http://www.cvsdude.org)

            01 Jun 2002 14:47 walles

            WinCVS makes CVS *harder*
            A clarification: As you said, I expected WinCVS to make CVS easier to use. For me however, WinCVS was not only "not easier" than command line CVS, but harder.


            YMMV of course, and people interested in Windows GUIs for CVS should definitely try more than one before deciding.

            31 May 2002 23:43 ageron

            Re: WinCVS no good

            > And your developers can still use their
            > beloved
            > Windows by using WinCVS
            > (www.wincvs.org)
            >
            > IMO, WinCVS is really no good. I
            > found it to be more complicated to use
            > than pure command line CVS (as can be
            > had on Windows using Cygwin). Another
            > Windows frontend for CVS that I haven't
            > used, but has a good rep is Tortoise
            > CVS. You may want to try that one
            > before WinCVS.


            I somewhat disagree:
            - yes, WinCVS is a bit complicated. You still need to know CVS well to be able to use it. I have tried out a couple of the existing CVS GUIs, and they all assume you know most of the details of CVS (except to a certain point Turtoise, as you pointed out). If you thought WinCVS would make CVS easier, well it doesn't: it's purely a graphical wrapper around CVS.
            - BUT I - and certainly many people - find that launching CVS commands visually is extremely convenient and often way faster than the command line: WinCVS is *great* for that purpose.

            Thx,
            Aurélien Géron.

            31 May 2002 07:10 walles

            WinCVS no good
            And your developers can still use their beloved
            Windows by using WinCVS
            (www.wincvs.org)


            IMO, WinCVS is really no good. I found it to be more complicated to use than pure command line CVS (as can be had on Windows using Cygwin (http://freshmeat.net/projects/cygwin/)). Another Windows frontend for CVS that I haven't used, but has a good rep is Tortoise CVS (http://www.tortoisecvs.org). You may want to try that one before WinCVS.

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