Projects / CompuPic

CompuPic

CompuPic is an interactive multimedia file manager and manipulation program which allows you to efficiently view, manage, catalog, thumbnail, and convert over 30 graphics formats. CompuPic is the first consumer-oriented graphics software to be ported to Linux from Windows.

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Recent releases

  •  03 Aug 2000 16:20

    No changes have been submitted for this release.

    •  26 Jun 2000 22:21

      Release Notes: Fixes for Maxi Show and Slide Show features and nearly all crashes related to BSD or SVR4 (Solaris/SCO) platforms.

      •  19 Jun 2000 20:07

        Release Notes: Printing support, and a large number of fixes.

        •  27 Jan 2000 18:07

          Release Notes: Various bugfixes and feature enhancements.

          •  11 Jan 2000 01:47

            Release Notes: Fixes were made for drawing glitches, a crash problem, various dialogs, mouse capture problems, the picture indexer, and the batch converter.

            Recent comments

            30 Jan 2000 13:46 unasmithyaleedu

            CompuPic as image catalog package
            CompuPic may be aimed at too many niches. It does both graphic image editing and cataloging, but doesn't do either job extremely well. There is a lot of competition in the image editing niche, even on Linux. There seems to be less competition in the image cataloging niche; CompuPic is the only one I have found so far for Linux (if there are others, would someone please let me know about them?).

            However, compared to other image catalogers on Mac or PC (ImageAXS, Extensis Pro, etc.), CompuPic 5.0 1036 lacks some important features:

            EPS files must have a TIFF "header" (preview?). I have good reasons for not including previews in my EPS files, but I need to see what's in them when I'm cataloging them, so I need a cataloging program that builds its own thumbnails if necessary.
            The PhotoCD (PCD) format is not supported by CompuPic Linux version.
            Keywording is rudimentary: no master keyword list. And the UI is a bit idiosyncratic.
            There does not appear to be any comments field, or any way to add new custom fields.
            Searching is also rudimentary: no boolean searches, no restricted-field searches.
            Finally, CompuPic's license agreement and handling of TIFF and GIF file formats makes this package CRIPPLE WARE. Forget the part about "free for personal use": this package is strictly consumer-oriented, yet the most casual user is almost guaranteed to use the package in such a way as to qualify as a "business" user, and be obligated to buy the package.


            If you have a professional image collection (stock photos, research materials, etc.), keep looking. But, if all you want is a file manager that shows nice big thumbnails of images and lets you shuffle images around and fiddle with them, this is the package for you. The good news is the price is low!


            12 Jan 2000 08:40 popinet

            Well, that really does not look that great to me ...
            Apart from an apparently efficient thumbnailing implementation (but the quality of the thumbnails is not that great either ...), all I can see is a big monolithic application. Is their any extension mechanism provided? And for a "beta" release the number of fatal bugs looks a bit excessive to me. The keyword mechanism is interesting but very limited. What would be nice is a real and flexible way to use the graphical interface in connection with an external database.

            14 Nov 1999 16:36 niterain

            Right now, at the top of the pack...
            I really like this viewer, and so far, I haven't seen anything that rivals it on linux. Its fast, its easy to use, its able to manage large archives. Its almost everything one would want... So far, I have tried (kview, ee, qiv, xv (I grew up with this one) and a few others). Now all I need to download is the new version of gimp. Peace...

            24 Sep 1999 23:03 hollins

            compupic
            I very much appreciate that you've ported a strong graphics manager to Linux; however, did you have to keep the windows icons? Even more insulting is that my Linux box is referred to as "My Computer". C'mon, guys.

            09 Jul 1999 18:40 zarlox

            Nice but...

            Now this seems like a nice program. It is sure faster at displaying images than many other similar programs I have tried.

            But I think it is a mistake that the UI looks like it uses some butt ugly pseudo Windows[TM] widget set.

            Can I say fltk ??

            Now if they could port it to gtk or even qt... :-)
            The buttons aren't quite as razor sharp as they could be. maybe reworking the buttons would be a good idea?

            Not meaning to be harsh or anything but you can see by their Webpage IMHO that they really should be using GIF instead of jpegs there. It is to blury to front for a company that makes graphics software for a living. It gives a bad first impression. Hehe maybe they are all coders and no *really* good graphics artists?

            Anyway. if they get things worked out this is going to be a good commercial package.

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